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What I See When I Look at Sound

BY PICA | 18-Jun-2014
What I See When I Look at Sound is an exhibition of sound that launches new pieces by five outstanding Australian artists. This exhibition unites radically different manifestations and improvisations on the theme of seeing and shaping sound. Ruminating on the fringes of the musical encounter before, during and after the live gig or performance, the works in the exhibition are synaesthetic offerings for our senses, profoundly shifting the registers that we usually associate with sound.
Venue: Perth Institute of Contemporary Art
Address: Perth Cultural Centre, 51 James Street Northbridge, 6003
Date: 12 July - 31 August 2014
Time: 10am - 5pm
Ticket: Free
Web: http://www.pica.org.au/view/What+I+See+When+I+Look+at+Sound/1844/
: https://www.facebook.com/PICAARTS
Kynan Tan, multiplicity, 2012-13 (still). Image courtesy the artist.
What I See When I Look at Sound is an exhibition of sound that launches new pieces by five outstanding Australian artists. Each artist has designed a work for extended play within PICA's galleries, speculating on what it means to visualise and encounter sound art today. The works are each systems unto themselves, often manipulating the creative process of improvisation while relying on graphic notations, code, algorithms and applications to generate or imagine new compositions. Matthew Gingold has created an extraordinary self-playing orchestra in which the instruments are light bulbs, radios and relays, creating a symphony of signals, shadows and electronic chatter. Cat Hope's sound sculpture of seven bass guitars and amps is a reverb tower of feedback which stands in dialogue with Lauren Brown's silent catalogue of sounds meditating on the way we listen to, see, transcribe and share sound. Kynan Tan's double projection and multi-screen work creates isolated and controlled sonic and visual chambers, a counterpoint to Lyndon Blue's interactive installation is a strange malleable music video in which film footage of the Hindenburg disaster and a soundtrack composed by the artist is manipulated by visitors via a theremin. This exhibition unites radically different manifestations and improvisations on the theme of seeing and shaping sound. Ruminating on the fringes of the musical encounter before, during and after the live gig or performance, the works in the exhibition are synaesthetic offerings for our senses, profoundly shifting the registers that we usually associate with sound.