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THOMAS LOVEDAY: THE PLANETS

BY Conny Dietzschold Gallery | 27-Mar-2014
Conny Dietzschold Gallery is delighted to present the second solo exhibition of Sydney-based artist Dr. Thomas Loveday. The Planets is part of Lovedays’ Phd submission titled - The Darkened Room: Painting as the Image of Thought - from The University of Sydney, where he is currently a Senior lecturer in Contemporary Art. Loveday returns with a bang, revealing brilliant splashes of colour fractured on large-scale canvases that will transport you to another universe. The Planets skillfully traces the paths and ambiguous identities of the planets, their colours and lines traced by their movements. It uses the direct and ancient direct sense experience of the planets as a starting point for an artists narrative.
Venue: Conny Dietzschold Gallery
Address: 99 Crown Street, East Sydney NSW 2010
Date: 1 - 26 April 2014
Time: Tue-Sat 11-5
Thomas Loveday, Jupiter, 2004-6, oil on canvas, 210 x 185 cm

Conny Dietzschold Gallery is delighted to present the second solo exhibition of Sydney-based artist Dr. Thomas Loveday. The Planets is part of Lovedays’ Phd submission titled “The Darkened Room: Painting as the Image of Thought” from The University of Sydney, where he is currently a Senior lecturer in Contemporary Art. Loveday returns with a bang, revealing brilliant splashes of colour fractured on large-scale canvases that will transport you to another universe. The Planets skillfully traces the paths and ambiguous identities of the planets, their colours and lines traced by their movements. It uses the direct and ancient direct sense experience of the planets as a starting point for an artists narrative.

Loveday asserts that in a society which adheres doggedly to its existing narrative framework, ‘art might be able to offer a loosening of the bonds at the core of conventional thinking. A fascination with astronomy and the planets at large is inbuilt in our perpetual hunger for knowledge and curiosity with the unknown. A direct experience of the planets on a clear night is of small points of light visible to the eye. The visible colours of the planets are subtle, their movements mapped on the grounds of curves, twists and turns. These observable aspects of the planets to ones senses, can be regarded as aesthetic elements for painting’. Yet Loveday moves far beyond a mere observational response to the planets and instead creates an artistic narrative that is ‘not written in the flat language of astronomy but in a figurative, layered array of aesthetic effects on a surface.’