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MYTH, MARK MAKING, COLOUR AND SYMBOLOGY IN ABORIGINAL ART

BY Artitja Fine Art | 06-Jun-2012
The use of colour in Australian Aboriginal art will be the topic of discussion when Melbourne art curator, publisher and writer Emily McCulloch Childs presents an illustrated lecture on MYTH, MARK MAKING, COLOUR & SYMBOLOGY IN ABORIGINAL ART
Venue: Earlywork
Address: 330 South Terrace, South Fremantle Western Australia
Date: 14th June 2012
Time: 7pm-8.30pm
Ticket: $30
Buy / Ticket: RSVP by 8 June info@artitja.com.au
Web: www.artitja.com.au
Invitation and ticket details
The use of colour in Australian Aboriginal art will be the topic of discussion when Melbourne art curator, publisher and writer Emily McCulloch Childs presents an illustrated lecture on MYTH, MARK MAKING, COLOUR & SYMBOLOGY IN ABORIGINAL ART on Thursday evening, 14th June in South Fremantle. In a special preview event to coincide with Artitja Fine Art’s EXPLORING COLOUR exhibition opening the day after, McCulloch Childs will explain aspects of Tjukurrpa or the Dreaming, including developments in the contemporary Australian Indigenous art movement. “Colour, as one of the main principles of art, holds a significant place within contemporary art in particular, and has, over the last 10 years, become a huge factor in contemporary Aboriginal art. Additionally, the tradition of ochre as the world’s first paint is central to Australia’s longest continuous trade, the ochre trade.” explains McCulloch Childs. Anna Kanaris, Director of Artitja Fine Art Gallery and host of McCulloch Child’s visit to WA says the talk will inform the audience of many aspects of Indigenous culture and the complex familial systems which guide and inspire the artists’ work. “Emily’s interest and art knowledge is embedded in her lineage” says Kanaris. “Not only was her grandfather the late Alan McCulloch AO a respected writer, art critic, artist and art historian, she is co-publisher (with her mother, well known Art journalist and critic Susan McCulloch OAM) of Contemporary Aboriginal Art: the complete guide – informally known as “the bible” of Aboriginal art!” In 2011 Emily was awarded a Creative Fellowship at the State Library of Victoria to research and write a book with her writer father Kevin Childs on Indigenous Warriors on the Australian frontier which she is currently researching.