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Lo-fi photography collective Ludlites inspired by 'space' for new Head On Photo Festival show

BY Steven Godbee | 16-Apr-2018
Australia's champions of lo-fi film photography, the Ludlites, return to the Head On Photo Festival in May 2018 with an exhibition of photographic artwork inspired by 'Space' - from David Bowie to 'personal space'.

Artist Talk Saturday 5 May, 4pm

Opening Event: Saturday 5 May, from 5pm to 7pm
To be opened by LISA FORREST

Olympian, Broadcaster, Author, Actor & Chief Life Officer at Evermind

Using photographic film and plastic lens such as the Holga and Diana, and sometimes pinhole cameras, 13 members of the Ludlite photographic collective, all leading photographic artists (12 Australians and 1 Canadian) have explored and interpreted the SPACE theme in a range of creative and unusual ways, with inspirations ranging from outer space to personal space.

These cameras have the ability to make multiple exposures on a single frame of film. This can be controlled but often the random nature of the lo-fi cameras produces quirky layered images. This is something that the Ludlites embrace as it perfectly suits their sci-fi and outer space inspired images, including some inspired by the music of David Bowie and Elton John. Other members of the collective have 'space' in very personal ways, addressing agoraphobia, aquaphobia, overcrowding and health matters.

With over 30 artworks showing, this exhibition demonstrates the special place this collective of lo-fi plastic lens users hold in the contemporary Australian art world. No other collective in the world maintains such an engaging and highly original approach to creating unusual photographic works using such low-tech cameras.

"High-end glass lenses that give an evenness in focus, contrast and colour are now the norm, even in our phones," says Tim Hixson, one of the founding Ludlites, "but we strive for the imperfection that is possible from shooting with a low-grade lens and film. You learn to 'feel' the effect of the light and trust your instincts then wait for the lab before you know you have a worthy image. The dreamy quality is something that many phone apps and the filters on Instagram actually attempt to replicate."