[Art News List]    [Submit News]    [BOOST News]

'Drawing on the Past' David Fairbairn

BY Stella Downer Fine Art | 07-Oct-2014
DAVID FAIRBAIRN has occasionally made small, notational drawings based on the works of a variety of both Classical and Modernist Painters. Drawing on the Past brings together FAIRBAIRN’s vision to fully instigate and realise his interest in this practice. Attracted to the complex, rhythmic and compositional dynamics of Poussin’s paintings, FAIRBAIRN endeavours to explore the underlying structures of his original works.
Historical art forms have traditionally served as an invaluable source for artists, from which to emulate and develop skills in their own drawing practice. Like many artists before him, DAVID FAIRBAIRN has occasionally made small, notational drawings based on the works of a variety of both Classical and Modernist Painters. In recent years he has taken to developing this practice, though always with a view that the drawings would remain essentially a private studio activity. Drawing on the Past brings together FAIRBAIRN’s vision to fully instigate and realise his interest in this practice. FAIRBAIRN’s research extends across a great spectrum of artists, beginning with Italian Medieval artists such as Giotto and Piero Della Francesca, through to studies of Goya, Velaquez, Rembrandt, Delacroix, and Poussin and into the Modernist era with studies of Paul Cezanne. Poussin has been the primary focus throughout FAIRBAIRN’s studies. 

Attracted to the complex, rhythmic and compositional dynamics of Poussin’s paintings, FAIRBAIRN endeavours to explore the underlying structures of his original works. FAIRBAIRN’s studies demonstrate his own distinct style as he translates and reinterprets the narrative workings of Poussin’s epic paintings through bold lines and colour. Aware that English artist Leon Kossoff had made drawings and etchings in front of the Poussins in the National Gallery Collection in London, FAIRBAIRN contends that his engagement would not only encompass Poussin, but also Kossoff’s interpretation of the great 16th Century painter. FAIRBAIRN approaches these studies with the hope they might lead to both an interesting transformation and interpretation of the subject matter and a richer and more profound understanding of his own practice.