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A stage – like a country – has its own rules and regulations

BY Starling Communications | 07-Oct-2019
Outer Urban Projects will premiere a new Australian work, The Audition, which examines the parallels of the selection processes experienced by actors seeking work and refugees seeking asylum.
Venue: La Mama Courthouse
Address: 349 Drummond Street, Carlton
Date: 13 – 24 November 2019
Time: 7.30pm Thu – Sat, 4pm Sun 11am and 6.30pm Wed 20 Nov
Ticket: $20 – $30
Buy / Ticket: lamama.com.au
Web: outerurbanprojects.org/works/theaudition
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A stage – like a country – has its own rules and regulations
Caption – Milad Norouzi and Irine Vela
Credit – Miguel Rios and Meredith O'Shea
The Audition director and Outer Urban Projects artistic director, Irine Vela, explains that asylum seekers share something in common with Australian actors – they are both outsiders with an uncertain status.

“Asylum seekers, just like actors, are forced to become an expert at waiting whilst remaining forever hopeful. But what if you are both an asylum seeker and an actor?” asks Vela.

The Audition is a new multi-authored work led by Vela with an exceptional creative team of new and established writers and performers.

Commanding young Iranian artists, Sahra Davoudi and Milad Norouzi have written pieces for The Audition and will also perform with Mary Sitarenos and Peter Paltos in the premiere this November at La Mama.

Davoudi’s work reveals seven poignant moments of a young woman’s life through seven mirrors; while Norouzi writes about a young man in conversation with God in a vast but suffocating new world.

Art and life are inseparable in Christos Tsiolkas’ work that reimagines Women of Troy as an audition piece and Melissa Reeves writes about the creaky mechanics of refusing asylum.

Friendship and politics run deep for playwright Wahibe Moussa as two women navigate their way through political perspectives and cultural conventions.

Tes Lyssiotis examines life from the inside an Australian detention centre: Woomera; while notions of the quintessential Australian woman are investigated when Patricia Cornelius places Olive from The Summer Of The Seventeenth Doll centre stage.

The Audition offers a sharp and insightful perspective into the protocols and powers that permit or veto entry into our country and onto our stages.