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The ‘Secretary of Bass’ opens up about mental health

BY Noelle Huser / University of Montana | 31-Oct-2018

Bassist Rob Cave has come far, living six years symptom-free from his schizophrenia. He has learned that it’s okay to put yourself out there and to trust yourself and the people around you, “not limiting yourself cause of the circumstances you are in.”

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The negative image of migration portrayed in Italian newspapers

BY Luca Arfini-Euronews / Aarhus University | 25-Oct-2018

On 4 March 2018, after the outcome of the Italian national elections had been revealed, there was yet another demonstration of the rising power of populist parties, whose campaigns always promise policies against migration. The far-right party, Lega, which has always opposed the migratory flows leading to the Italian coast, increased its share of the vote from 4.1% to 17.69%.

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The stigma lives on

BY Khethokuhle Mthethwa / North-West University | 25-Oct-2018

Depression in the black community is largely undocumented. The stigma surrounding this significant matter continues to silence many black people - young and old. In worst case scenarios, some are silenced forever.

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The Challenges Facing Indie Musicians in Hong Kong

BY Reported by Katherine Li and Rachel Yeo; Edited by Jade Li / Hong Kong Baptist University | 25-Oct-2018

As most people head home at the end of the working week, it’s just the start of yet another Friday night of jamming at MOM Live House in North Point. Multi-coloured laser slice through the music while the crowd cheer the performers with drinks in hand. This is “The Week Hong Kong Indie Music Festival”. There are performances every night with a different theme each week and there’s a line-up of more than 25 acts. The performers are all unknown local indie bands.

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Hong Kong street artists struggle to brighten up the city

BY Reported by Phoebe Lai; Edited by Robert McGain; Photos edited by Kobie Lee / Hong Kong Baptist University | 25-Oct-2018

People gather in an alleyway next to a quirky antique store on Hollywood Road. They snap photos in front of “The Kowloon Walled City”, a mural outside an old building. “They want to promote a kind of local Eastern lifestyle in contrast with a Western equivalent,” said Ms. Mou, “so they pay the artist to depict something very local in Hong Kong.”

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How Chinese treats hungry ghosts

BY Reported by Holly Chik and Michelle Ng; Video edited by Angela Cheung / Hong Kong Baptist Universit | 25-Oct-2018

Watch the video to know more about the customs and traditions of the festival and visitors' view about the event.

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The Last of the Hungry Ghost

BY Reported by Holly Chik and Michelle Ng; Edited by Sean Hsu and Jianne Soriano / Hong Kong Baptist University | 24-Oct-2018

The challenges of keeping the tradition alive: Reduced into cinder, it is the joss paper, not the tradition.

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COLD WAR:THE ERA OF BRINKMANSHIP(1947-1963)

BY Abrar Sadif Islam / Victoria University | 23-Oct-2018

According to the German dictator, Adolf Hitler after the end of World War 2 two countries would emerge as superpowers ,they are will be the United States and the Soviet Union.Hitler's prediction was surprisingly accurate.After the end of two devastating wars(world war 1 and world war 2) the population of the world got the chance to witness “THE COLD WAR” which was the political tension between the United States and USSR(Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) characterized by propaganda,competition,threats and proxy wars raged by surrogates.Simply, in other words,The US and Soviet Union instead of fighting a direct hot war they fought for such as, making their individual ideologies renowned as the Americans were Capitalists and Soviets were Communists.

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#InTheCityJHB connects Culture, Music and the city’s colourful youth

BY Kabelo Joshua Ntini / University of the Witwatersrand | 18-Oct-2018

South Africa’s In The City Music Festival took the music festivities and experience up a notch this Sunday, with the rebranding of the festival into Can Do In The City, in collaboration with Nampak Bevcan’s CAN DO! Brand and the Los Angeles based indie record label, Soulection. The festival expanded into a three show takeover with the main show hosted at Johannesburg’s Go to event venue, Ellis Park Stadium. Johannesburg’s multicultural buzz and exhilaration could be felt from the onset of the festival, while the city’s trendy and fashionable concert-goers converged together at the music festival. The festival hosted soulection acts such as Sango, Jarreu Vandal and a host of other international acts like 6lack and Aminé.

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A Wage Theft Culture

BY Dessy Rosalina / Macquarie University | 10-Oct-2018

Wage theft culture is widespread throughout Australia with a quarter of international students and backpackers receiving $12 or less per hour, around half legal minimum salary.

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More than just free wine and cheese

BY Chloe Lalonde / Concordia University Montreal | 13-Sep-2018

Every wondered what a vernissage is? Being an artist isn’t just about creating work; it’s about sharing that work with others, capturing their attention and making them think. A vernissage is a celebration of an artwork’s first step into the world.

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The Australian Obsession

BY Madelyn Smith / The University of Newcastle | 27-Aug-2018

Australia's fixation on the land is nothing new. Throughout history, the landscape played a major role in countless films, novels, poems and songs - a role that's not going away any time soon. So why are we so obsessed with our landscape? #landscape #Australian #obsession

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Taut: An Exhibition Review

BY Miranda Hine / Queensland University of Technology | 09-Jul-2018

Systems of support make for precarious object interactions in Ally McKay's exhibition Taut. Objects are assembled in tentative arrangements, expected - somehow- to support each other against inescapable physical forces. Taut invites us into a beautiful balancing act between tension, failure and endurance. It's an act we have all at some point been familiar with. In systems where rules have already been set, either social rules or rules of gravity, we have little choice but to navigate them regardless of how little sense they make or support they afford us. Using simple materials linked to building and construction, Ally reflects on her own vulnerabilities and the resilience required to constantly stay upright against the pressure to collapse and fall within these systems. Ally's constructions are a determination to make things work. Her quiet installations embrace fragility and speak of growth and adaptation to new environments.

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CHINESE CAFÉ IN NOTTINGHAM A RELAXING HAVEN FOR TEA LOVERS

BY Malvika Padin / Nottingham Trent University | 03-Jun-2018

What's the best way to unwind from a tough day? Curling up with a hot drink, and maybe some quiet conversation. That's exactly what this hidden haven in Nottingham offers its tea loving visitors. #tealovers #AugustMoonTea #Nottingham #Hockley

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"They live for us- The Yellows"

BY Loveneesh Sharma / Self-taught | 16-May-2018

"They live for us" - is an observation and imaginative view about the indispensable objects around us in our mundane life. How we are connected and dependable to them consciously and unconsciously is a matter of the way, how we treat them.

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Sounds of Change

BY Claire Galloway / Edinburgh Napier University | 15-May-2018

Will the music industry ride the post-Weinstein wave? "We come in peace, but we mean business." That was the warning from Janelle Monáe to the music industry during this year’s Grammy Awards ceremony. The annual event - in its 60th incarnation - set the stage for intensified red-carpet activism, as celebrities used white roses to symbolise their allegiance with the #TimesUp movement. The award winners, however, remain predominantly male, and soon #OscarsSoWhite was joined by #GrammysSoMale. Just over 90 per cent of the 899 individuals nominated for Grammy Awards between 2013 and 2018 were male. Since 1947, only six women have been nominated for the Grammys' prestigious Producer of the Year. A woman has yet to win. #WomenInMusic #MeToo #GrammysSoMale #Timesup @Surgemag

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Trompe L'ou

BY Marcus Johnson / Victorian College of the Arts | 30-Oct-2017

Trompe L'ou is a variation on the French term Trompe-l'œil. It's an art technique that uses realistic imagery to create an optical illusion. Louise Woodmansey is an artist that has been perfecting this technique for many years. Her latest project, in a cafe at the old paper mill in Fyansford, is becoming a real attraction. This short film reveals a remarkable partnership behind the work.

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CEO Marco Bizzarri to remove animal fur from Gucci’s 2018 Spring/Summer collection.

BY Fahad Tariq / Staffordshire University | 22-Oct-2017

Innocent and harmless animals around the world are being brutally slaughtered in the name of fashion. Locked up, caged and trapped just so that their pelts can be used in our clothes. This needs to change. Gucci have made a remarkable decision to remove animal fur which will take effect from their 2018 Spring/Summer collection. Can brands such as Burberry and Balenciaga follow Gucci's lead? #removeanimalfur #stopkillinganimalsforfashion #gucci

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All This Panic: NYC Teenagers Get Real in New Documentary

BY Yuri Snell / Curtin University | 10-Oct-2017

A lush, intimate and cinematic look into the lives of teenagers as they grow into young adults in New York City. New documentary ‘All This Panic’ debuted last week at Tribeca Film Festival and has already received raving reviews. Praised for its honest portrayal, the film explores the thoughts and behaviours of teenagers looking for their place and purpose in the world.

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Catherine Truman: No Surface Holds at JamFactory, Adelaide

BY Georgina Tselekidis / University of South Australia | 10-Oct-2017

The SALA Festival (South Australian Living Arts Festival) is an annual celebration of local art by established and emerging artists, showcasing their work in diverse spots around the state. With such a great variety of exhibitions and events on offer this year, it was an amazing experience to see some of these striking pieces in the flesh. I had the pleasure of visiting the JamFactory in Adelaide’s CBD to see Catherine Truman’s stunning series: No Surface Holds.

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The women behind Melbourne label Two Threads

BY Anastasia McInerney / RMIT journalism student | 31-Aug-2017

Meet design duo Karen Fennell and Sally Anderson, the bowerbirds behind the Melbourne womenswear label. #TwoThreads @TwoThreads @twothreadsclothing #twothreads #melbourne #label #upcycled #ethical

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Let’s Talk: The Young Arts and Journalism Awards with Volker Janssen

BY Alexandria Abishegam / Student View | 29-Aug-2017

A month ago, I sat down to have a chat with one of the founding members of the Young Arts and Journalism Awards in Australia, Volker Janssen. The art and journalism scene has always intrigued me, with so many new ways of expression and the rise of social media, the industry has become an even tougher nut to crack into. As many may already know, it is not the lack of content, but the lack of quality that is in demand. To combat this issue, the YAJA was set up to give students an opportunity to showcase their talents and express themselves in a unique form. With graduates struggling to find meaningful work experience, they now have a community that will support them.

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Make Winter Electric: Interview with Kate Sellars-Jones

BY Maggy Liu / University of Melbourne | 09-Aug-2017

If you are finding it difficult to face the dreary Melbourne landscape this winter, perhaps what you are missing is a beautiful scarf from Things Are Electric to provide that extra pocket of warmth and brilliant pop of colour to brighten your day. Recently, I had the pleasure to chat to the owner and designer of the brand, Ms Kate Sellars-Jones, about her passion for art, the inspiration behind her latest collection as well as her entrepreneurship journey. @ThingsAreElectric #ThingsAreElectric @things.are.electric

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A Tale of Four Migrant Women, Told by Four More

BY Noor Gillani / Queensland University of Technology | 14-Jul-2017

In her play Remembering Palestine, Director Aleea Monsour shines a spotlight on the lives of four refugee women, and in doing so a whole generation of youth whose roots trace back to no-man’s land.

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Half Pipe Dream

BY Emma Harvey / BA Media at Macquarie University | 21-Jun-2017

Emma Harvey meets a skateboarding pro who lost it all.

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Europeans at the Gallery: Celebrating Art and Business

BY Jasmijn van Houten / RMIT University | 03-Jun-2017

A variety of European business partners decked out the great hall of the National Gallery of Victoria on Monday night, to celebrate each other and the latest Melbourne Winter Masterpieces exhibition, and one rookie came along to see what it was all about. #ngvmelbourne

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Logies Recap Podcast

BY Blair Cowen / Macleay College | 27-Apr-2017

On Sunday evening, Blair Cowen covered the red carpet for the 59th annual TV Week Logie Awards at Crown Casino. In true Logies style he got all the goss from the stars of The Real Housewives of Melbourne, The Block, Wentworth and a range of news personalities nominated at the prestigious event. Don’t miss the glitz, the glamour, as well as a few hilarious and embarrassing moments. - Produced and hosted by Blair Cowen, co hosted by Darren Lawton

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Review: The Culture

BY Noor Gillani / Queensland University of Technology | 25-Apr-2017

With the passing of International Women’s Day, Wollongong playwright Laura Jackson’s second work The Culture shines a necessary light on persisting gender and sexuality issues existing in contemporary cultural discourse.

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SAM LEACH PHD ASSESSMENT EXHIBITION: REVIEW

BY Sophie Heizer / RMIT University | 25-Apr-2017

Last night, the RMIT School of Art had the rare pleasure of hosting the work of Adelaide born contemporary artist and RMIT University academic Sam Leach. With an impressive set of post-nominals already under his belt, Leach’s latest exhibit at RMIT’s School of Art gallery was the last step towards adding one more.

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Le Parcours du Faubourg: Nouméa's Old Colonial Homes

BY Michael Brunott / University of Queensland | 22-Apr-2017

Today I decided to explore Nouméa’s colonial heritage by strolling along the Parcours du Faubourg. The Parcours is a walking trail which journeys past Nouméa’s oldest examples of colonial houses in the Faubourg Blanchot neighbourhood. In the early 1860’s this area was known as Artillery Valley. Colonists arriving from France to the new settlement of Fort-de-France (Nouméa) were encouraged to take root here in this small valley behind Nouméa’s city centre. At that time, an acre of land could be bought for 35 francs, and by 1871, virtually all the land surrounding the newly built Route du Port Despointes was owned by a Mr. Barthélémy Blanchot. In 1874 he advertised his plots for sale in the local paper and sold them as Faubourg Blanchot land, giving the area the name it holds today.

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Dance Academy Movie Premier

BY Jasmine Morris / University of Western Australia | 03-Apr-2017

“I always knew that in another life I could fly. Which is why in this life I dance.” I had the privilege of attending the world premiere of Dance Academy: The Movie to take a first look at the highly anticipated follow up to the popular ABC television series of the same name. There was excitement in the air as numerous fans flocked to the red carpet. I was among the lucky few who had the opportunity to go behind the scenes to discuss the making of the film with the cast and crew.

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Fake Chinese movie now money-spinner in Lagos

BY Nurudeen Oyewole / University of Lagos (UNILAG) | 18-Mar-2017

It is hard to walk through the streets of Lagos or any other Nigerian Cities these days without coming across roadside marketers who specialise in the sale of all manner of films and musical disks. Of greater notoriety among such discs on sale are those of Chinese origin which have been pirated and translated to Nigerian local languages. The writer investigated how this has become a "thriving business" with marketers making lots of money even as their acts make mockery of the country’s Copyright Law.

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A Tale of Two Critics: An Interview with David Stratton

BY Richard Houlihan / Griffith Film School | 12-Mar-2017

Cinema has always been an obsession for the English-born Australian critic David Stratton. As the documentary about him, "David Stratton: A Cinematic Life", screens soon in Australia, the man himself discusses the film, writing for Variety, and his beard.

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