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La eterna lucha contra el miedo

BY Adrián Mesa/ Xavier Gomes / Universidad de La Laguna | 01-Nov-2019
La eterna lucha contra el miedo

La concepción histórica de que el periodismo es un promotor del bien común se ha ido desligando poco a poco, hasta calar en la población la idea de que la profesión se ha convertido en un negocio más debido al materialismo desenfrenado que impera en las grandes editoriales. En algunos casos por supervivencia y en otros por codicia, los medios de comunicación pasan a ser agentes al servicio de determinadas estructuras del poder. Esta situación puede afectar a los periodistas que, a la hora de publicar cierto tipo de informaciones, pueden verse coaccionados por los intereses de los entes económicos del medio, que manejan a su antojo la agenda informativa.

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Telling Stories Through Love

BY Yeo Sze-G / Nanyang Technological University, Wee Kim Wee School of Communication of Information - Communication Studies | 31-Oct-2019
Telling Stories Through Love

In commemoration of the Singapore Bicentennial, Chong Kai Yan and Pang Xue Qiang put a twist on Singapore’s history by retelling it through love stories. (Published in 2018. Written by: Loh Yun Jin, Edited by: Dewey Sim, Photo by: Loh Yun Jin)

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The Boy Who Does Make-Up

BY Sheryl Chua / Nanyang Technological University / Communication Studies | 30-Oct-2019
he Boy Who Does Make-Up

Make-up is often associated with women, but Nigel Phua challenges that stereotype and uses it as a platform where he can freely express himself by taking on different guises. (Published in 2018. Edited by: Dewey Sim, Photos by: Beverly Chew)

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Hitting The Right Note

BY Amira Yunos / Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University | 30-Oct-2019
ting The Right Note

WKWSCI freshmen Edson Charntor, Clement Ng and Kristian Pineda (all CS ’22) each approach music differently to achieve their own sounds. A singer, a busker and a rapper — these three first-year students from the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information have different styles of music. As independent musicians, they had to pave the way to success on their own, encountering numerous difficulties along the way. Charntor had friends who doubted if he would make it, Ng had to actively seek performing venues and opportunities and Pineda encountered failed record deals at the start of his career. Today, these three musicians have one thing in common: Their personal journeys to find their own voice have hit the right note.

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Creative writing — a journey of self discovery and breaking stereotypes for marginalised foreign domestic workers

BY Katherine Li / Hong Kong Baptist University | 23-Oct-2019
Creative writing — a journey of self discovery and breaking stereotypes for marginalised foreign domestic workers

In this competitive and vibrant city, the tens of thousand of foreign domestic workers behind the scenes are often not seen or heard. Facing both economic pressure from home and the local stereotype that they are not competent enough for intellectual tasks, some have turned to creative writing as their emotional outlet, resulting in poignant and unique stories of love, suffering, and perseverance.

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Panel Addresses Colorims within the Latinx Community

BY Mariandrea Vergel / Florida International University / Broadcast Media | 19-Oct-2019
Panel Addresses Colorims within the Latinx Community

What does it mean to “look Latino?” And who gets to decide? As part of Hispanic Heritage Month, the New York City Commission on Human Rights held a panel discussion yesterday to address the issues of colorism and discrimination within the Latinx community. Featuring Afro-Latinx speakers, the event was moderated by Brea Frank, host of Univision’s “La Gozadera.”

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Give It Up 4 Peace this October!

BY Negin Nia / University of British Columbia | 17-Oct-2019
Give It Up 4 Peace this October!

Throughout October, we're giving up something we can't live without in support of refugees or newcomers who come to BC and give up all that they have.

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Where are the South Asian women in UK music?

BY Malvika Padin / Nottingham Trent / Journalism | 29-Sep-2019
Where are the South Asian women in UK music

As a South Asian woman trying to carve my own path in the music industry, the topic of representation of South Asian women in the UK music scene, is something very personal to me. In conversation with a few(of the many) brilliant women in music , sat in the dressing rooms of the Working Men's Club in Bethnal Green, London, there is laughter, sincere compliments and a serious message of togetherness in diversity that blooms. Originally written for @galdemzine, this piece has received a lot of positive attention from fellow journalists, PR, artists with a BBC podcast producer reaching out to me for my comment on South Asian representation ; truly something I'm proud of.

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Young people’s “new religion” to seek help through superstition

BY Vimvam Tong, Tomiris Urstembayeva / Hong Kong University - International Journalism | 11-Sep-2019
Young people’s - new religion - to seek help through superstition

More young people in Hong Kong are seeking out fortune tellers for simple, quick and cheap advice on life decisions. Local fortune tellers say these young people are coming to them because they are feeling more intense pressures from work, relationships and living spaces. #Youth #youngpeople #newreligion #superstition #hongkong

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The Changing Views of Western Australia's Landscapes

BY Isobel Goodwin-Moore / Macquarie University / Bachelor of Arts Majoring in Journalism and Non-Fiction Writing | 16-Aug-2019
The Changing Views of Western Australia's Landscapes

Western Australian artist Robert Ewing records the way the world changes around him through his expressive art practice. #541ArtSpaceSydney #RobertEwing @IsobelGM1

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Puckered lips and selfie sticks - social media is a child’s worst enemy.

BY Rebecca Borg / La Trobe University Victoria / Bachelor of Communications (Journalism) | 16-Aug-2019
Puckered lips and selfie sticks - social media is a childs worst enemy.

When I think of childhood, I think of building sandcastles on the beach on a hot summer’s day. The sound of laughter at playgrounds. Running and dancing. Children being children. Never would I have imagined innocent faces all dolled up, acting 20 instead of 12 while little boys pump weights believing that this is the solution to overcoming their insecurities. Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you the stresses of children in 2019. @rebeccaaborg #puckeredlips #selfiesticks #childrentoday #socialissues

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Taking Their Stories to the Streets - Indigenous Art Program 2019 'Shared Connections'

BY Alicia Selby / Central Queensland University / Communication - Journalism Major | 23-May-2019

The Brisbane CBD has come alive with a dynamic outdoor art installation that celebrates 15 indigenous artists across 13 sites throughout the city, bringing stories of past, present and future to life throughout May, June and July 2019. The exhibit is part of the Brisbane City Council’s Indigenous Art Program ‘Shared Connections’ and showcases artwork from emerging and established local talent aimed at developing a deeper connection and understanding of Australia’s First Nations’ people in the wider community. #indigenousart #sharedconnections #brisbaneartanddesign #indigenousartprogram2019 @blaklash.projects

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Life of Ups and Downs

BY Shuang "Valerie" Chen / Northwestern University, Editorial Journalism | 06-Feb-2019
Life of Ups and Downs

Chicago-based improv musician Dave Asher, diagnosed with bipolar disease, talks about his music journey. Music and improvisation have always played an important part in Asher’s personal discovery and healing. Film and edit by Shuang "Valerie" Chen. Music by Dave Asher & Higherwave.

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Profile: Beach Fossils at Bottom Lounge

BY Ellise Shafer / Medill School of Journalism | 05-Feb-2019
Beach Fossils at Bottom Lounge

Before Wednesday’s show, WNUR got the chance to catch up with Beach Fossils about touring in Asia, the indie music scene and what Post Malone really smells like.

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The ‘Secretary of Bass’ opens up about mental health

BY Noelle Huser / University of Montana | 31-Oct-2018

Bassist Rob Cave has come far, living six years symptom-free from his schizophrenia. He has learned that it’s okay to put yourself out there and to trust yourself and the people around you, “not limiting yourself cause of the circumstances you are in.”

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The negative image of migration portrayed in Italian newspapers

BY Luca Arfini-Euronews / Aarhus University | 25-Oct-2018

On 4 March 2018, after the outcome of the Italian national elections had been revealed, there was yet another demonstration of the rising power of populist parties, whose campaigns always promise policies against migration. The far-right party, Lega, which has always opposed the migratory flows leading to the Italian coast, increased its share of the vote from 4.1% to 17.69%.

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The stigma lives on

BY Khethokuhle Mthethwa / North-West University | 25-Oct-2018

Depression in the black community is largely undocumented. The stigma surrounding this significant matter continues to silence many black people - young and old. In worst case scenarios, some are silenced forever.

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The Challenges Facing Indie Musicians in Hong Kong

BY Reported by Katherine Li and Rachel Yeo; Edited by Jade Li / Hong Kong Baptist University | 25-Oct-2018

As most people head home at the end of the working week, it’s just the start of yet another Friday night of jamming at MOM Live House in North Point. Multi-coloured laser slice through the music while the crowd cheer the performers with drinks in hand. This is “The Week Hong Kong Indie Music Festival”. There are performances every night with a different theme each week and there’s a line-up of more than 25 acts. The performers are all unknown local indie bands.

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Hong Kong street artists struggle to brighten up the city

BY Reported by Phoebe Lai; Edited by Robert McGain; Photos edited by Kobie Lee / Hong Kong Baptist University | 25-Oct-2018

People gather in an alleyway next to a quirky antique store on Hollywood Road. They snap photos in front of “The Kowloon Walled City”, a mural outside an old building. “They want to promote a kind of local Eastern lifestyle in contrast with a Western equivalent,” said Ms. Mou, “so they pay the artist to depict something very local in Hong Kong.”

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How Chinese treats hungry ghosts

BY Reported by Holly Chik and Michelle Ng; Video edited by Angela Cheung / Hong Kong Baptist Universit | 25-Oct-2018

Watch the video to know more about the customs and traditions of the festival and visitors' view about the event.

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The Last of the Hungry Ghost

BY Reported by Holly Chik and Michelle Ng; Edited by Sean Hsu and Jianne Soriano / Hong Kong Baptist University | 24-Oct-2018

The challenges of keeping the tradition alive: Reduced into cinder, it is the joss paper, not the tradition.

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COLD WAR:THE ERA OF BRINKMANSHIP(1947-1963)

BY Abrar Sadif Islam / Victoria University | 23-Oct-2018

According to the German dictator, Adolf Hitler after the end of World War 2 two countries would emerge as superpowers ,they are will be the United States and the Soviet Union.Hitler's prediction was surprisingly accurate.After the end of two devastating wars(world war 1 and world war 2) the population of the world got the chance to witness “THE COLD WAR” which was the political tension between the United States and USSR(Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) characterized by propaganda,competition,threats and proxy wars raged by surrogates.Simply, in other words,The US and Soviet Union instead of fighting a direct hot war they fought for such as, making their individual ideologies renowned as the Americans were Capitalists and Soviets were Communists.

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#InTheCityJHB connects Culture, Music and the city’s colourful youth

BY Kabelo Joshua Ntini / University of the Witwatersrand | 18-Oct-2018

South Africa’s In The City Music Festival took the music festivities and experience up a notch this Sunday, with the rebranding of the festival into Can Do In The City, in collaboration with Nampak Bevcan’s CAN DO! Brand and the Los Angeles based indie record label, Soulection. The festival expanded into a three show takeover with the main show hosted at Johannesburg’s Go to event venue, Ellis Park Stadium. Johannesburg’s multicultural buzz and exhilaration could be felt from the onset of the festival, while the city’s trendy and fashionable concert-goers converged together at the music festival. The festival hosted soulection acts such as Sango, Jarreu Vandal and a host of other international acts like 6lack and Aminé.

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A Wage Theft Culture

BY Dessy Rosalina / Macquarie University | 10-Oct-2018

Wage theft culture is widespread throughout Australia with a quarter of international students and backpackers receiving $12 or less per hour, around half legal minimum salary.

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More than just free wine and cheese

BY Chloe Lalonde / Concordia University Montreal | 13-Sep-2018

Every wondered what a vernissage is? Being an artist isn’t just about creating work; it’s about sharing that work with others, capturing their attention and making them think. A vernissage is a celebration of an artwork’s first step into the world.

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The Australian Obsession

BY Madelyn Smith / The University of Newcastle | 27-Aug-2018

Australia's fixation on the land is nothing new. Throughout history, the landscape played a major role in countless films, novels, poems and songs - a role that's not going away any time soon. So why are we so obsessed with our landscape? #landscape #Australian #obsession

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Taut: An Exhibition Review

BY Miranda Hine / University of Queensland | 09-Jul-2018

Systems of support make for precarious object interactions in Ally McKay's exhibition Taut. Objects are assembled in tentative arrangements, expected - somehow- to support each other against inescapable physical forces. Taut invites us into a beautiful balancing act between tension, failure and endurance. It's an act we have all at some point been familiar with. In systems where rules have already been set, either social rules or rules of gravity, we have little choice but to navigate them regardless of how little sense they make or support they afford us. Using simple materials linked to building and construction, Ally reflects on her own vulnerabilities and the resilience required to constantly stay upright against the pressure to collapse and fall within these systems. Ally's constructions are a determination to make things work. Her quiet installations embrace fragility and speak of growth and adaptation to new environments.

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CHINESE CAFÉ IN NOTTINGHAM A RELAXING HAVEN FOR TEA LOVERS

BY Malvika Padin / Nottingham Trent University | 03-Jun-2018

What's the best way to unwind from a tough day? Curling up with a hot drink, and maybe some quiet conversation. That's exactly what this hidden haven in Nottingham offers its tea loving visitors. #tealovers #AugustMoonTea #Nottingham #Hockley

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"They live for us- The Yellows"

BY Loveneesh Sharma / Self-taught | 16-May-2018

"They live for us" - is an observation and imaginative view about the indispensable objects around us in our mundane life. How we are connected and dependable to them consciously and unconsciously is a matter of the way, how we treat them.

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Sounds of Change

BY Claire Galloway / Edinburgh Napier University | 15-May-2018

Will the music industry ride the post-Weinstein wave? "We come in peace, but we mean business." That was the warning from Janelle Monáe to the music industry during this year’s Grammy Awards ceremony. The annual event - in its 60th incarnation - set the stage for intensified red-carpet activism, as celebrities used white roses to symbolise their allegiance with the #TimesUp movement. The award winners, however, remain predominantly male, and soon #OscarsSoWhite was joined by #GrammysSoMale. Just over 90 per cent of the 899 individuals nominated for Grammy Awards between 2013 and 2018 were male. Since 1947, only six women have been nominated for the Grammys' prestigious Producer of the Year. A woman has yet to win. #WomenInMusic #MeToo #GrammysSoMale #Timesup @Surgemag

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Trompe L'ou

BY Marcus Johnson / Victorian College of the Arts | 30-Oct-2017

Trompe L'ou is a variation on the French term Trompe-l'œil. It's an art technique that uses realistic imagery to create an optical illusion. Louise Woodmansey is an artist that has been perfecting this technique for many years. Her latest project, in a cafe at the old paper mill in Fyansford, is becoming a real attraction. This short film reveals a remarkable partnership behind the work.

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