A crowd sourced online art news feed

[Art News List]   [YAJA Entries]

Streeton Trio for Canberra's National Portrait Gallery concert 27 May

BY Sirmai Arts Marketing | 11-May-2017
The Streeton Trio, one Australia’s finest classical music ensembles, comes to the National Portrait Gallery, Canberra on Saturday evening 27 May with a short, sweet concert of Romantic masterworks.
The internationally acclaimed trio featuring Emma Jardine (violin), Benjamin Kopp (piano) & Umberto Clerici (cello – and currently resident with the Canberra Symphony Orchestra) presents short concert of two the Romantic repertoire’s most popular chamber works: Piano Trios by Mendelssohn and Smetana.

Named after the Australian Impressionist painter, Sir Arthur Streeton and described by Musica Viva as “Australia’s most internationally successful piano trio”, the Streeton Trio was formed in 2008, in Geneva, Switzerland, by three young Australian musicians.

In 2010, the trio was selected to be a part of the prestigious European Chamber Music Academy, where it was in residence for three years. Winner of the 2011 Music Viva Chamber Music Competition, the trio has been laureate of several prestigious international competitions and has won scholarships from Australia Council for the Arts, Arts Victoria and Ian Potter Cultural Trust and, in 2012, was featured as Musica Viva’s Rising Stars ensemble. It has received great acclaim for performances in venues such as, Apeldoorn Festival, Pablo Casals Festival (Prades) and Bangalow Festival. Acclaimed, recent performances include appearances at Wigmore Hall, Het Loo Royal Palace (Holland), Shanghai Oriental Arts Centre, Trondheim Festival and concert halls across the United Kingdom, China, Holland, Lithuania, Norway, Germany, France, Austria and Switzerland. They also have an impressive recording history and feature regularly on classical music radio. Visit www.streetontrio.com for more.

Bedřich Smetana was one of the first fervently nationalistic Czech composers. While most of his career was dedicated to writing operas in the Czech language, on the few occasions that he was inspired to write chamber works, he tended to produce masterpieces. The catalyst for this composition was the devastating death of four-year old daughter Bedřiška from scarlet fever. The trio is a contrast of the darkness of inconsolable grief and the light feelings of nostalgia for his daughter; the first movement features her favourite tune.

Written in 1839, the first of two piano trios, Mendelssohn’s Piano Trio in D minor is probably his most well-known chamber composition and easily his most beloved. Despite its famed lyricism, the trio as a whole is full of driving energy and demonstrates what power the piano trio really holds.