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Five Shows- One Gallery: New works by Polly Hollyoak, Raymond Carter, Cally Lotz, Lee Goller and Jarred Harknett

BY Kate Wallace | 10-Oct-2017
Set to open on 13 October at 6pm, Alternating Current Art Space is pleased to announce our next group of solo exhibitions by Polly Hollyoak, Raymond Carter, Cally Lotz, Lee Goller and Jarred Harknett. @alternatingcurrentartspace
Beginning in Gallery One, Wanderlust by Polly Hollyoak focuses on elements that have traditionally made up the backgrounds of her paintings. This shift stems largely from a desire to explore the 'interplay of colour theory, form, shape, and materials through the medium of painting.' In doing so, pattern and colour continue to feature strongly in paintings that provide a discourse between pop and abstraction.

In Gallery Two, Raymond Carter draws upon a range of industrial and commercial materials to construct his artworks, in this instance a series of tape paintings. In Impromptu, Carter establishes a set of constraints and limitations through which to develop these works. Exploring ‘ways of nurturing the contemplative in abstraction,’ Carter’s practice is informed by sources including ‘the aesthetics of the industrial and functional, investigation of skill and technique, performance, music, modernist and contemporary culture.’

Working within the still life genre, the idea of containment is explored in Cally Lotz’s latest exhibition Contain. Here the gallery and canvas alike are used as metaphors in which to enclose and retain the objects depicted. As a result, Lotz questions ‘the tussle between the object depicted and the canvas itself… the subject matter refers to being restricted rather than limited.’ In Gallery Three, the quiet and restrained nature of these objects provide an opportunity for Lotz to ‘investigate the formal aspects of painting while challenging the tradition of still life.’

Lee Goller presents A Magical and Incomprehensible Universe in Gallery Four. As Goller describes, the works explore 'the coexistence of disparate beings and events that have been shaped by random meetings and events.' Observing the nature of these connections through mixed media assemblages, A Magical and Incomprehensible Universe presents a narrative of characters significant in Goller's life, creating a fairytale-like atmosphere one wanders and gets lost in.

Finally, Jarred Harknett 'explores printmaking, framing, and the role of art as both decoration and a space for conceptual reflection’ in Fluidity. Traditional ink techniques of Japanese paper marbling are drawn upon to create loose, organic patterns of which are countered by a digital manipulation or reflection of the same forms. Taking place in The Cupboard, Fluidity continues Harknett’s interest in craftsmanship, process and presentation.